Ning Tang, C’98, to give Founders’ Day address Oct. 12

Ning Tang, C'98

Ning Tang, C’98, will be the speaker at Founders’ Day Convocation, which will be held at noon Friday, Oct. 12. He will receive an honorary doctor of civil law degree during the ceremony. The Convocation will include the conferral of three additional honorary degrees and will be streamed live.

During the Convocation, Christy S. Coleman, CEO of the American Civil War Museum, will receive an honorary doctor of civil law; S. Waite Rawls, III, president of the American Civil War Museum Foundation, will receive an honorary doctor of civil law; and the Most Rev. Mark J. Strange, Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church, will receive an honorary doctor of divinity. The Honorable William F. Winter, former governor of Mississippi, received an honorary doctor of civil law during a special ceremony in Jackson, Mississippi, on August 16, 2018.

In conjunction with the Founders’ Day celebration, Christy Coleman and Waite Rawls from the American Civil War Museum (Richmond, Virginia) will offer a public conversation at 4:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, in Guerry Auditorium. The American Civil War Museum is the nation's first museum to explore the story of the Civil War from three perspectives—Union, Confederate, and African American. Coleman and Waite will have a conversation about understanding the Civil War from these multiple perspectives.

Ning Tang is the founder and CEO of CreditEase, a global financial technology leader specializing in inclusive finance and wealth management. Following his graduation from Sewanee, he worked on Wall Street with initial public offerings, bond issuance, and mergers and acquisitions. He founded CreditEase in 2006 as China’s first marketplace lending company, and over the past 12 years, the company has become one of China’s leading financial technology companies, specializing in small business and consumer lending, as well as wealth management for China’s rapidly growing class of affluent investors. In 2015, CreditEase listed its online consumer finance and wealth management subsidiary, Yirendai, on the New York Stock Exchange, the first public offering of a financial technology company from China in the global capital markets.

christy colemanChristy S. Coleman is CEO of the American Civil War Museum in Richmond, Virginia, the nation’s first museum to explore the story of the Civil War from three perspectives—Union, Confederate, and African American. Coleman began her career at Colonial Williamsburg, becoming director of historic programs. In 1999, she was named president and CEO of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit. She returned to Virginia to head the American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar, and in 2013 she facilitated its merger with the Museum of the Confederacy to create the American Civil War Museum. She is a tireless advocate for the power of museums, narrative disruption, and inclusivity.

 

 

waite rawlsS. Waite Rawls III is the president of the American Civil War Museum Foundation. He served as president and CEO of the Museum of the Confederacy before that museum and the American Civil War Center consolidated operations in 2013 to create the new American Civil War Museum. Rawls formerly spent 30 years as an investment banker in New York and Chicago. He has been a visiting professor at the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia.

 

 

 

 

 

bishop strangeThe Most Reverend Mark Strange Bishop of Moray, Ross, and Caithness and Primus of the Scottish Episcopal Church—the first Bishop of Moray, Ross, and Caithness to serve as Primus in more than 80 years. Strange began his theological training at Lincoln Theological College. He was ordained a deacon in 1989 at Worcester Cathedral and served in parishes including St. Wulstan’s, Church Warndon; Holy Trinity, Elgin; and in the communities of Lossiemouth, Dufftown, and Aberlour. Bishop Strange was elected canon of Inverness Cathedral in 2000, Bishop of Moray, Ross, and Caithness in 2007, and Primus in 2017.

 

 

 

 

gov. winter and vcGovernor William Forrest Winter served as governor of Mississippi from 1980-1984. His term is best remembered for the Education Reform Act of 1982, considered the most significant piece of educational legislation enacted in Mississippi since 1870. The law established public kindergartens and was the first serious attempt to improve state education in more than 20 years. Following military service during World War II, he was first elected to the Mississippi House of Representatives in 1947. The University of Mississippi has named the William Winter Institute for Racial Reconciliation and the William F. Winter Professorship in his honor. Winter was awarded the 2008 Profile in Courage Award by the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum for his work advancing education and racial reconciliation.